Few things are more sad or difficult than finding out that a loved one has suffered a personal loss. Many times we fail to reach out to a loved one in grief out of shyness or uncertainty. We worry that we don’t have the words, or know what we can do to help or console our friend.

Many times, it’s easier to offer a virtual hug or send a text instead of picking up the phone or talking face-to-face. Of course, the most difficult things for us to do are what can be the most helpful to a person in mourning.

Listen

When someone is grieving, they tend to hear clichés such as: “They’re in a better place”, “at least they’re not suffering” and “it was his time”. Instead of a cliché, offer an ear. Ask them about their loved one by name (“Tell me about Jim”) and encourage them to talk about their memories.

Share Memories

If you knew the deceased, you can offer a great deal of condolence by sharing positive memories that perhaps your loved one was unaware of.

Give a Gift or Memento

Simple gestures such as a card, a plant or other small gift can bring comfort to your friend or relative in their time of grief. It also can be easier to approach them if you have a small card or gift in tow. If your loved one is a person of faith, then be sure to get an appropriately themed card or book to encourage them to lean on their faith.

Offer Help and Hope

Instead of saying “let me know how I can help”, offer specific help such as bringing a meal on a particular day, running an errand for them or helping with child care or housework. You can also ask, “What can I do to help?”

Offer hope by believing in their ability to move forward. You can also offer to take your loved one to a grief support group at their church or a local Meetup group. It can help the bereaved to talk or listen to others going through the same thing.

Check in with them later

With our own busy lives, it can be difficult to remember to follow up, so set a reminder on your phone or calendar to check up on your friend down the road. Give them a call or drop by to visit them and see how they’re doing.

With a little love and support, you can help your loved one see that there are brighter days ahead.

If you or a loved one could use professional help through the grieving process, please contact us today.

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